Posts Tagged ‘large-format scanning’

Aperture Cards: The Last of an Art Form

  Every once in a while an email pops into my inbox that reminds me how unique The Crowley Company is. A few weeks ago, I received notice from our CEO that a major manufacturer of aperture cards in Asia had stopped production, thereby rendering our Wicks and Wilson division the world’s only manufacturer of aperture cards. Say what?! After embracing this fact through fantasies of royal successions (because the Wicks division is located in the U.K. and after binge-watching “The Crown” during the…

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Happy Hanksgiving, Part Four

What a difference four years makes! When we first followed Hank, the beloved English bulldog of Crowley’s technical support administrator, Cassie Hahn, around the halls of Crowley three years ago he was a small ball of pudge waddling past adoring employees and modeling atop patron book scanners. Since then, Hank and Crowley have come together each “Hanksgiving” to reflect on the many things for which we at Crowley are thankful (and this year we’ve added Hank’s thanks as well). We are…

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The Cold War in Hotlanta: Crowley and Princeton Discuss Digitization Project at SAA

Last week I traveled to the Society of American Archivists annual conference in Atlanta, Ga to hear Crowley Senior Imaging Specialist, Meghan Wyatt, and Princeton University Library Archivist, Rachel Van Unen, discuss the digitization of Seeley G. Mudd Library’s Cold War manuscripts. In the coming weeks you will be able to hear the discussion for yourself in Crowley’s first podcast. For now, get a taste of the project and the partnership between Crowley Imaging and Princeton University Libraries. Project Origins In 2012, the decision…

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Determining the Best Method for Scanning Bound Materials

We’ve addressed the issue of book scanning methods in a previous blog, however the information bears repeating. Books are still one of the world’s most popular methods of information recording, but paper (or even in its earliest forms, papyrus or rice paper) is not the most resilient of materials. It is for this reason that digitization is essential to extending the lifespan of the precious words and images held within their covers. The options for scanning bound materials are numerous and…

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